Tag Archives: USPTO

When Can a Domain Name Be a Trademark? Supreme Court Will Decide

On Friday, November 8, 2019, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in United States Patent and Trademark Office et al. v. Booking.com BV, to decide whether “the addition by an online business of a generic top-level domain (“.com”) to an otherwise generic term can create a protectable trademark.” The case involves the travel website Booking.com, which … Continue Reading

Supreme Court Finds “Scandalous” Trademark Rule Unconstitutional

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the U.S. Trademark Act’s section 2(a) provision precluding registration of “immoral” or “scandalous” trademarks violates the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. The ruling came in the case of Iancu v. Brunetti, an appeal from the U.S. Trademark Office’s refusal to register the trademark F.U.C.T. for a line … Continue Reading

USPTO Issues New Examination Guide for Examination of Marks for Cannabis and Cannabis-Related Goods and Services

The newly released Examination Guide  for trademark examiners at the US Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) entitled “Examination of Marks for Cannabis and Cannabis-Related Goods and Services after Enactment of the 2018 Farm Bill” clarifies that applications for hemp and hemp derived products, including CBD, filed after Dec. 20, 2018 as either intent-to-use or having … Continue Reading

Play-Doh Scent is Now a Federally Registered Trademark: Why Brands Should Embrace Non-Traditional Trademarks

Did you know you can federally register a scent as a brand? Hasbro, Inc.’s recent registration of the smell of Play-Doh “toy modeling compounds” has highlighted one of the lesser-known brand categories: scents. The United States defines a trademark as any “word, name, symbol, or device, or any combination thereof…to identify and distinguish his or … Continue Reading

Federal Circuit Strikes Down the Lanham Act’s Ban on Scandalous and Immoral Marks in the Wake of Tam

In the wake of Matal v. Tam, where the Supremes unanimously held that the “disparagement clause” in Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1052(a), violates the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit unsurprisingly struck down the Lanham Act’s … Continue Reading

USPTO Switches Gears on Registration of Disparaging Marks, but Not on Scandalous Marks

On June 26, 2017, a week after the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously held that the “disparagement clause” in Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1052(a), violates the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment in Matal v. Tam, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (the “USPTO”) has updated (Examination Guide 1-17) its … Continue Reading

Deadwood on the U.S. Trademark Register: Random Audit Pilot Program Proposed to be Made Permanent

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has long been concerned about so called “deadwood” on its register — registrations granted where the registration is not being used or not used on all goods/services identified in the registration, but the registration’s existence keeps others from obtaining registration protection for similar goods/services. This is particularly an … Continue Reading
LexBlog